Orchestral

2023
/
Orchestral

Wake Up! Concerto for Orchestra

This concerto for orchestra is inspired by the poem, Awake, Asleep, written by the Nepali poet, Rajendra Bhandari, and was commissioned by the San Diego Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra, Washington.

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2022
/
Orchestral

Movements: Flute Concerto

This work, premiered in 2022, is the second American solo flute concerto by a Black composer. In a time of cultural and civil change, this piece helps in creating a more diverse and inclusive environment for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) musicians, and a richer repertoire for the orchestral community.

Read More
2023
/
Orchestral

brea(d)th

Brea(d)th is a classical work, inspired by the enduring presence of George Floyd the Ancestor, asking America to consider an equitable future. We come to the resilient and root-rich Twin Cities as outsiders, but we composed this work from within the walls of Black emotion, curiosity, and dignity. The piece explores a historical timeline that stretches from the pre-colonial to the present condition, and perhaps further, into a post-pandemic America. Who would we be if we used covid-19 as an opportunity to focus on both public health, *and* public healing? Our entire country has endured a trauma… how do we publicly heal?...

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2023
/
Orchestral

Songs of Separation

We all, as humans, experience separation in a variety of forms. Whether it be through the death of a loved one, a break-up, a divorce or a permanent relocation from family and friends, a parting of ways is a part of life for us all. To illustrate this musically, I chose to use the timeless words of the 13th century Persian poet, Jalāl al-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī to convey this inevitable human experience. Each of the four movements depict moments of grief, sorrow as well hope and encouragement. Rūmī reminds us through his words that “What hurts you, also blesses you”

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2023
/
Orchestral

Troubled Water - Trombone Concerto

In January 2020, Kenneth Thompkins of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra asked me to write a concerto for him as the principal trombonist of the orchestra. He suggested a piece about the Underground Railroad since Michigan was one of the last states for enslaved persons to reach before getting to freedom in Canada. The Underground Railroad was a network of clandestine routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early- to mid-19th century. It was used by enslaved African Americans primarily to escape into free states and Canada. The piece is inspired by the many stories, accounts and experiences told by many enslaved people and abolitionists.

Read More
2023
/
Orchestral

Four Black American Dances

Dance has always been a part of any culture. Particularly in Black American communities, dance is and has been the fabric of social gatherings. There have been hundreds, perhaps thousands of dances created over the span of American history that have originated from the social climate of American slavery, Reconstruction and Jim Crow. This piece is an orchestral study of the music that is associated with the Ring Shout, the Waltz, Tap Dance and the Holy Dance. All of these dances are but a mere representation of the wide range of cultural and social differences within the Black American communities.

Read More
2021
/
Orchestral

Graffiti

This work is inspired by the countless artists around the world whose self-expression allows their audiences to redefine and reexamine art. Is it art or vandalism? Co-commissioned by the Arizona State University Symphony Orchestra, Oberlin College and Conservatory, and the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music made possible by the Frank Ticheli Guest Artist Endowed Fund.

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2021
/
Orchestral

Breathe

"Drop Thy still dews of quietness // Till all our striving cease” Deeply inspired by Howard Thurman, I wanted to write a piece that encourages others to simply reflect and breathe.

Read More
2022
/
Orchestral

Profiles

Profiles is a short orchestral study in three separate movements based on the late visual art of Romare Bearden. Most of Bearden’s work reflects African American culture in urban cities as well as the rural American south. Although Bearden was born in Charlotte, NC, he spent his most of his life in Harlem, New York. With its vibrant artistic community, this piece aims to highlight the rich energy and joyous sceneries that Harlem expressed as it was the hotbed for African American culture.

Read More

Written in Stone

The theme that he and his librettist have chosen — acceptance of same-sex marriage within the black church — is a challenging one.

Read More
2018
/
Orchestral

THE BLOCK

“The Block” is a short orchestral study based on the late visual art of Romare Bearden. Most of Bearden’s work reflects African-American culture in urban cities as well as the rural American south.

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2017
/
Orchestral

PORTRAIT OF A QUEEN

This piece traces the evolution of black people in America through the lens of the black woman.

Read More
2019
/
Orchestral

THIS LAND

This piece is inspired by Emma Lazarus’ gentle, welcoming words in her poem, “New Colossus”. Lush, bright harmonies in the strings are used to represent hope and unity.

Read More
2019
/
Orchestral

AMEN! (2017 rev. 2019)

This piece pays homage to my family's four generational affiliation with the Pentecostal church. My intent is to re-create the musical experience of an African American Pentecostal church service that I enjoyed being apart of while growing up in this denomination.

Read More
2020
/
Orchestral

FATE NOW CONQUERS

This piece was inspired by a journal entry from Ludvig van Beethoven’s notebook written in 1815: “Iliad. The Twenty-Second Book But Fate now conquers; I am hers; and yet not she shall share In my renown; that life is left to every noble spirit And that some great deed shall beget that all lives shall inherit.”

Read More
2021
/
Orchestral

Tales: A Folklore Symphony

This piece explores African American folklore as well as Afrofuturists stories. This work is commissioned by the Sphinx Organization for its 25th Anniversary and the University of Michigan Symphony Orchestra.

Read More
cOMPONENT divider
This concerto for orchestra is inspired by the poem, Awake, Asleep, written by the Nepali poet, Rajendra Bhandari, and was commissioned by the San Diego Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra, Washington.
Read More
This work, premiered in 2022, is the second American solo flute concerto by a Black composer. In a time of cultural and civil change, this piece helps in creating a more diverse and inclusive environment for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) musicians, and a richer repertoire for the orchestral community.
Read More
Brea(d)th is a classical work, inspired by the enduring presence of George Floyd the Ancestor, asking America to consider an equitable future. We come to the resilient and root-rich Twin Cities as outsiders, but we composed this work from within the walls of Black emotion, curiosity, and dignity. The piece explores a historical timeline that stretches from the pre-colonial to the present condition, and perhaps further, into a post-pandemic America. Who would we be if we used covid-19 as an opportunity to focus on both public health, *and* public healing? Our entire country has endured a trauma… how do we publicly heal?...
Read More
We all, as humans, experience separation in a variety of forms. Whether it be through the death of a loved one, a break-up, a divorce or a permanent relocation from family and friends, a parting of ways is a part of life for us all. To illustrate this musically, I chose to use the timeless words of the 13th century Persian poet, Jalāl al-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī to convey this inevitable human experience. Each of the four movements depict moments of grief, sorrow as well hope and encouragement. Rūmī reminds us through his words that “What hurts you, also blesses you”
Read More
In January 2020, Kenneth Thompkins of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra asked me to write a concerto for him as the principal trombonist of the orchestra. He suggested a piece about the Underground Railroad since Michigan was one of the last states for enslaved persons to reach before getting to freedom in Canada. The Underground Railroad was a network of clandestine routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early- to mid-19th century. It was used by enslaved African Americans primarily to escape into free states and Canada. The piece is inspired by the many stories, accounts and experiences told by many enslaved people and abolitionists.
Read More
Dance has always been a part of any culture. Particularly in Black American communities, dance is and has been the fabric of social gatherings. There have been hundreds, perhaps thousands of dances created over the span of American history that have originated from the social climate of American slavery, Reconstruction and Jim Crow. This piece is an orchestral study of the music that is associated with the Ring Shout, the Waltz, Tap Dance and the Holy Dance. All of these dances are but a mere representation of the wide range of cultural and social differences within the Black American communities.
Read More
This work is inspired by the countless artists around the world whose self-expression allows their audiences to redefine and reexamine art. Is it art or vandalism? Co-commissioned by the Arizona State University Symphony Orchestra, Oberlin College and Conservatory, and the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music made possible by the Frank Ticheli Guest Artist Endowed Fund.
Read More
"Drop Thy still dews of quietness // Till all our striving cease” Deeply inspired by Howard Thurman, I wanted to write a piece that encourages others to simply reflect and breathe.
Read More
Profiles is a short orchestral study in three separate movements based on the late visual art of Romare Bearden. Most of Bearden’s work reflects African American culture in urban cities as well as the rural American south. Although Bearden was born in Charlotte, NC, he spent his most of his life in Harlem, New York. With its vibrant artistic community, this piece aims to highlight the rich energy and joyous sceneries that Harlem expressed as it was the hotbed for African American culture.
Read More
“The Block” is a short orchestral study based on the late visual art of Romare Bearden. Most of Bearden’s work reflects African-American culture in urban cities as well as the rural American south.
Read More
This piece is inspired by Emma Lazarus’ gentle, welcoming words in her poem, “New Colossus”. Lush, bright harmonies in the strings are used to represent hope and unity.
Read More
This piece pays homage to my family's four generational affiliation with the Pentecostal church. My intent is to re-create the musical experience of an African American Pentecostal church service that I enjoyed being apart of while growing up in this denomination.
Read More
This piece was inspired by a journal entry from Ludvig van Beethoven’s notebook written in 1815: “Iliad. The Twenty-Second Book But Fate now conquers; I am hers; and yet not she shall share In my renown; that life is left to every noble spirit And that some great deed shall beget that all lives shall inherit.”
Read More
This piece explores African American folklore as well as Afrofuturists stories. This work is commissioned by the Sphinx Organization for its 25th Anniversary and the University of Michigan Symphony Orchestra.
Read More
cOMPONENT divider

Four Black American Dances

2023
/
Orchestral

Dance has always been a part of any culture. Particularly in Black American communities, dance is and has been the fabric of social gatherings. There have been hundreds, perhaps thousands of dances created over the span of American history that have originated from the social climate of American slavery, Reconstruction and Jim Crow. This piece is an orchestral study of the music that is associated with the Ring Shout, the Waltz, Tap Dance and the Holy Dance. All of these dances are but a mere representation of the wide range of cultural and social differences within the Black American communities.

Troubled Water - Trombone Concerto

2023
/
Orchestral

In January 2020, Kenneth Thompkins of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra asked me to write a concerto for him as the principal trombonist of the orchestra. He suggested a piece about the Underground Railroad since Michigan was one of the last states for enslaved persons to reach before getting to freedom in Canada. The Underground Railroad was a network of clandestine routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early- to mid-19th century. It was used by enslaved African Americans primarily to escape into free states and Canada. The piece is inspired by the many stories, accounts and experiences told by many enslaved people and abolitionists.

Songs of Separation

2023
/
Orchestral

We all, as humans, experience separation in a variety of forms. Whether it be through the death of a loved one, a break-up, a divorce or a permanent relocation from family and friends, a parting of ways is a part of life for us all. To illustrate this musically, I chose to use the timeless words of the 13th century Persian poet, Jalāl al-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī to convey this inevitable human experience. Each of the four movements depict moments of grief, sorrow as well hope and encouragement. Rūmī reminds us through his words that “What hurts you, also blesses you”

brea(d)th

2023
/
Orchestral

Brea(d)th is a classical work, inspired by the enduring presence of George Floyd the Ancestor, asking America to consider an equitable future. We come to the resilient and root-rich Twin Cities as outsiders, but we composed this work from within the walls of Black emotion, curiosity, and dignity. The piece explores a historical timeline that stretches from the pre-colonial to the present condition, and perhaps further, into a post-pandemic America. Who would we be if we used covid-19 as an opportunity to focus on both public health, *and* public healing? Our entire country has endured a trauma… how do we publicly heal?...

Wake Up! Concerto for Orchestra

2023
/
Orchestral

This concerto for orchestra is inspired by the poem, Awake, Asleep, written by the Nepali poet, Rajendra Bhandari, and was commissioned by the San Diego Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra, Washington.

Profiles

2022
/
Orchestral

Profiles is a short orchestral study in three separate movements based on the late visual art of Romare Bearden. Most of Bearden’s work reflects African American culture in urban cities as well as the rural American south. Although Bearden was born in Charlotte, NC, he spent his most of his life in Harlem, New York. With its vibrant artistic community, this piece aims to highlight the rich energy and joyous sceneries that Harlem expressed as it was the hotbed for African American culture.

Movements: Flute Concerto

2022
/
Orchestral

This work, premiered in 2022, is the second American solo flute concerto by a Black composer. In a time of cultural and civil change, this piece helps in creating a more diverse and inclusive environment for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) musicians, and a richer repertoire for the orchestral community.

Tales: A Folklore Symphony

2021
/
Orchestral

This piece explores African American folklore as well as Afrofuturists stories. This work is commissioned by the Sphinx Organization for its 25th Anniversary and the University of Michigan Symphony Orchestra.

Breathe

2021
/
Orchestral

"Drop Thy still dews of quietness // Till all our striving cease” Deeply inspired by Howard Thurman, I wanted to write a piece that encourages others to simply reflect and breathe.

Graffiti

2021
/
Orchestral

This work is inspired by the countless artists around the world whose self-expression allows their audiences to redefine and reexamine art. Is it art or vandalism? Co-commissioned by the Arizona State University Symphony Orchestra, Oberlin College and Conservatory, and the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music made possible by the Frank Ticheli Guest Artist Endowed Fund.

FATE NOW CONQUERS

2020
/
Orchestral

This piece was inspired by a journal entry from Ludvig van Beethoven’s notebook written in 1815: “Iliad. The Twenty-Second Book But Fate now conquers; I am hers; and yet not she shall share In my renown; that life is left to every noble spirit And that some great deed shall beget that all lives shall inherit.”

AMEN! (2017 rev. 2019)

2019
/
Orchestral

This piece pays homage to my family's four generational affiliation with the Pentecostal church. My intent is to re-create the musical experience of an African American Pentecostal church service that I enjoyed being apart of while growing up in this denomination.

THIS LAND

2019
/
Orchestral

This piece is inspired by Emma Lazarus’ gentle, welcoming words in her poem, “New Colossus”. Lush, bright harmonies in the strings are used to represent hope and unity.

THE BLOCK

2018
/
Orchestral

“The Block” is a short orchestral study based on the late visual art of Romare Bearden. Most of Bearden’s work reflects African-American culture in urban cities as well as the rural American south.

PORTRAIT OF A QUEEN

2017
/
Orchestral

This piece traces the evolution of black people in America through the lens of the black woman.

Written in Stone

The theme that he and his librettist have chosen — acceptance of same-sex marriage within the black church — is a challenging one.