NIGHT TRIP

2020
/
Opera

Details

Category

Opera

instrumentation

chamber opera

duration

20 minutes

commissioned by

Washington National Opera at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and first produced at the Kennedy Center during the 2019/2020 season. WASHINGTON POST REVIEW (2020)

premiered by

Libretto by Sandra Seaton

CAST TIME: July 1958—13 years after the end of WWII—Pre-Civil Rights era

CONCHETTA, niece, 16 years old, mezzo soprano
UNCLE WESLEY—baritone
UNCLE MACK—tenor
GAS STATION ATTENDANT. Wears Confederate headband—white man—tenor POLICE OFFICER---white man—baritone

SYNOPSIS

The uncles arrive in Chicago after dark at their sister’s apartment to pick up their niece Conchetta. Big city music. Conchetta is thrilled to go “home” to see her relatives—her grandmother, her aunts, her “play aunts.” She sings about the rough world of the big city and longs for the small town life in Tennessee.

The uncles sing about the good old days when they were in the service. Wesley shows off his fully operational A-11 Army watch to Pack. They enjoy using military language.

The uncles remind her of their orders to take care of the box of money, the one under the seat. The men stop for gas in Indiana, ask the attendant if they can use the restroom, only to be told that none is available for them. In anger, they order the attendant to take out the hose then drive off without paying.

As they’re speeding away, we hear sirens. They’re stopped by a policeman and the gas station attendant. An argument ensues between the uncles, the attendant and the police. Conchetta steps out of the car and offers them her food.

Wesley steps forward and directs the police officer to look under the seat for another box filled with dollar bills. With money in hand, there is still more hesitation by officer. The police and attendant drive off with the box of money.

Bittersweet. In the final solo Conchetta is still caught up in the experience of the road. Her uncles try to reassure her that all is well again. She has been changed by the experience.

WASHINGTON POST REVIEW (2020)

cOMPONENT divider

NIGHT TRIP

2020
/
Opera
duration

20 minutes

instrumentation

chamber opera

premiered by

commissioned by

Washington National Opera at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and first produced at the Kennedy Center during the 2019/2020 season. WASHINGTON POST REVIEW (2020)

Libretto by Sandra Seaton

CAST TIME: July 1958—13 years after the end of WWII—Pre-Civil Rights era

CONCHETTA, niece, 16 years old, mezzo soprano
UNCLE WESLEY—baritone
UNCLE MACK—tenor
GAS STATION ATTENDANT. Wears Confederate headband—white man—tenor POLICE OFFICER---white man—baritone

SYNOPSIS

The uncles arrive in Chicago after dark at their sister’s apartment to pick up their niece Conchetta. Big city music. Conchetta is thrilled to go “home” to see her relatives—her grandmother, her aunts, her “play aunts.” She sings about the rough world of the big city and longs for the small town life in Tennessee.

The uncles sing about the good old days when they were in the service. Wesley shows off his fully operational A-11 Army watch to Pack. They enjoy using military language.

The uncles remind her of their orders to take care of the box of money, the one under the seat. The men stop for gas in Indiana, ask the attendant if they can use the restroom, only to be told that none is available for them. In anger, they order the attendant to take out the hose then drive off without paying.

As they’re speeding away, we hear sirens. They’re stopped by a policeman and the gas station attendant. An argument ensues between the uncles, the attendant and the police. Conchetta steps out of the car and offers them her food.

Wesley steps forward and directs the police officer to look under the seat for another box filled with dollar bills. With money in hand, there is still more hesitation by officer. The police and attendant drive off with the box of money.

Bittersweet. In the final solo Conchetta is still caught up in the experience of the road. Her uncles try to reassure her that all is well again. She has been changed by the experience.

WASHINGTON POST REVIEW (2020)

2
Carlos Simon